Kappa Kappa Gamma House Tour

A tour of my sorority house, Kappa Kappa Gamma at the University of New Mexico. We are the Gamma Beta chapter. This video was filmed and edited on my iPad. The photos are used by permission of the owners or are owned by me. The music is by Owl City and Carly Rae Jepsen.

Our Story: Kappa Kappa Gamma

The organization I have chosen is the sorority I joined in the Fall of 2010, Kappa Kappa Gamma.

Kappa was founded in 1870 in Monmouth, Illinois at Monmouth College when six young women marched into the chapel at Monmouth wearing golden keys in their hair and declared themselves as the members of Kappa Kappa Gamma. Kappa’s official founding date is October 13, 1870. The word “sorority” didn’t exist at the time of its founding so it is actually a women’s fraternity. In all of our documents and correspondence, Kappa is referred to as “the fraternity,” and is never referred to as a sorority.

Kappa’s flower is the mythical Fleur-de-Lis. The flower we use as its stand-in is the iris. The Fleur-de-Lis is also one of Kappa’s symbols along with owls and keys. The fraternity’s colors are dark and light blue and its jewel is the sapphire. Our national philanthropy is Reading Is Fundamental. Kappa’s national open motto used to be “A Tradition of Leadership,” but in June 2012 was changed to “Aspire To Be.”

I chose to use Kappa Kappa Gamma for my final project because it is a big part of my life and also such a large organization with a long history. Kappa is important to me because without the help of these women I call my sisters, I would not be as successful academically or have the leadership traits that they have taught me.

In Kappa, it is impossible not to be inspired almost immediately by the women who make up this organization. Some notable Kappas are designer Kate Spade, actresses Sophia Bush and Ashley Judd, and New Mexico Lieutenant Governor, Diane Denish.

I want readers to learn more about Greek Life in general, but to see what Kappa Kappa Gamma specifically is about. We really are an organization whose aim is to cultivate leaders and foster creativity through leadership. I held an officer position in Kappa in 2012 as Panhellenic Delegate and was given the freedom to essentially do what I wanted to with my position and my adviser supported and helped me with my endeavors. Additionally, I gained a friend in my adviser who of course is a Kappa as well but I wouldn’t have built that relationship if I wasn’t constantly encouraged to be in contact with her and communicate with her.

Kappa is not just 100 college women living in the same big house with Greek letters plastered across the front. It’s your adviser whose kids you’ll babysit on Friday nights; it’s your dance teacher who later gives you a job to help you through college; it’s a network of strong, empowered women who will be your sisters for as long as you allow them.

Social Media Audit — Kappa Kappa Gamma

For this week’s blog, I’ve decided to do a social media audit for my sorority, Kappa Kappa Gamma. Kappa was founded in 1870, shortly after the end of the Civil War and before the word “sorority” was even introduced. Kappa is a women’s fraternity founded on the belief that women have the potential to impact the world.

Kappa’s target audience for its Web presence is potential new members of the fraternity, new members, active members, alumnae and members of the media who may need to research Kappa for journalistic reasons. Kappa lists all of its social media outlets on the home page upper right hand corner, or “above the fold.”

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The different social media sites listed are Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, the Kappa blog, LinkedIn, YouTube and Flickr. The fraternity recently changed its logo and tagline over the summer. The new logo is the modern-looking blue fleur-de-lis and the new tagline is “Aspire to be.” They have done a pretty good job with keeping social media profile photos consistent with the new logo. Only the LinkedIn and Pinterest pages are different; each have the fraternity crest as the photo but different versions on each page.

The only social media site Kappa is not using that I find very surprising is Instagram, especially because college students use Instagram all the time. Almost all of the girls I know in Kappa have an Instagram and I think if Kappa were to start an account, it would be very successful. I have found that Twitter and Instagram seem to be the most popular social media sites with my group of friends.

Strengths the organization has in its social media presence is man power (or woman power, in this case). There are a lot of people on staff to create content and a lot of members they are following or who are constantly sending in content and inspiring further content creation. Weaknesses are that some of the pages don’t get publicized a lot. There are not a lot of recent uploads on the YouTube page and the pages that get updated most often are Facebook and Twitter. I think an easy update to the YouTube would be to publicize that the undergraduate giving challenge deadline is nearing. They could have updated the video that they originally made and post a new one to inspire and excite members about giving to the Kappa Foundation.

Competition that Kappa could have among social media could be with other Greek letter organizations in a “who did it better” sort of way. Unofficial Kappa pages can also be a problem with anonymous accounts that post inappropriate things or just general things that make the fraternity look bad.